The courageous, historic decision to halt gas exploration

In pausing the search plans, Energy Minister Elharrar recognized the dire threat of greenhouse emissions. Now we need a ‘Climate Law’ to set longterm targets.

Dec 20, 2021

Energy Minister Karin Elharrar’s decision to cease all gas exploration for at least a year is one of the bravest and most worthy decisions made by an Israeli minister in recent years.

The Biden government, the EU reports and developed world nations have stated that in order to moderate global warming, gas exploration must be limited. Nonetheless, Israel continued business as usual, providing open checks for gas exploration as a major energy source for Israel even after 2030. That is until Elharrar’s courageous decision.

The whole world has long concluded that methane, which makes up most of the natural gas mixture, is a greenhouse gas that creates a greenhouse effect tens of times higher than other pollutants. Meanwhile, a professional report published by Adam Teva V’Din states that methane emissions increase by about 8% the total annual emissions of greenhouse gases in Israel.

Elharrar’s decision is an important step towards the necessary paradigm shift to a low-carbon economy; it should be followed by steps towards long-term systemic change through the enactment of a ‘Climate Law.’ The law is existential for Israel, both to reduce greenhouse gases and to prepare Israel as a desert coastal state for the damage of climate crises at infrastructure and budgetary levels. The law must include ambitious targets for carbon reset by 2050 and intermediate targets for carbon reduction by 45% by 2030 and for at least 50% electricity generation from renewable energy by 2030. The law must provide for mechanisms for mapping disaster areas, government budgets for local authorities, and the obligation to conduct climate surveys for future infrastructure and development likely to aggravate the dimensions of the disaster.

Read also:
Iran Admits Fire in Natanz Is a Setback to Centrifuge Program

Continue reading at blogs.timesofisrael.com

We remind our readers that publication of articles on our site does not mean that we agree with what is written. Our policy is to publish anything which we consider of interest, so as to assist our readers  in forming their opinions. Sometimes we even publish articles with which we totally disagree, since we believe it is important for our readers to be informed on as wide a spectrum of views as possible.