Saturday, 22 January , 2022

Shock therapy

Two ways ahead for Europe and the former USSR | By...

By Dimitris Konstantakopoulos Today we publish the second and final part of the interview with Sergei Yurievich Glaziev (You can read the first part of...

The neoliberalism-shock therapy connection: Naomi Klein’s The Shock Doctrine

Published online 16 October 2007. cassiodorusblog.wordpress.com This is a review of Naomi Klein’s The Shock Doctrine, a detailed, journalistic history of neoliberalism which emphasizes its connection...

Poland: The “best” Yankee Trojan horse between social crisis...

At the time when Solidarnosc was legal (september 1980 – december 1981) its direction made a lot of provocations and miscalculated decisions so the enthousiasm that prevailed in september 1980 was gradually lost what explains the rather successfully introduced martial law in december 1981 and the then relative popularity of the leading « People’s Poland » aristocratic General Wojciech Jaruzelski. At the beginning of 1981, Solidarnosc had almost 10 millions members …but when it was banned, quite few workers did strike to save it and two years later, when the regime created a new Trade Union, the OPZZ, 7 millions out of 12 millions salaried people did join it. When Solidarnosc was relegalised in 1989, it could not even recuperate 2 millions of its former 10 millions members, the majority of salaried remaining then, 5 millions of them, in the « communist » but bureaucratised OPZZ Trade union. Since that time both opportunistically lead trade unions lost the majority of their former members.